The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years

7pm, Saturday 13th October 2018

Eight Days a Week DVD Cover
Publicity Material

Poster (PDFJPG)
Leaflet (PDF - 2up) 

Free film screening of 'Hot August Night' (2016)

From Academy Award-winning director Ron Howard, "The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years" tells the story of these exceptional touring years — from the perspectives of the band, its orbit, the four fans, and their world. The film recreates the touring experience through the eyes of the band members themselves, where every stop was an adventure.

Get your own backstage pass! 100 minutes of extras including unseen interviews with Paul and Ringo, plus five rarely seen full length performances of The Beatles live in concert. Fully digitally re-mastered. 

Winner 2017 Grammy for Best Music Film. Nominated for 2017 British Academy Award 

The screening will be preceded by a Neil Diamond singalong, and followed by supper.

This film is a taster for the upcoming Neil Diamond Choir - an 8 week course starting on Thursday 16th May (7.30-9pm).  This choir is about the joy of singing together.  ALL VOICES WELCOME.  Phone Kate (0412) 771 394 to register.

Choir Venue: North Narrabeen Baptist Church Hall, 13 Grenfell Avenue, North Narrabeen

Cost: $140 ($110 concession)

"Ron Howard trashes the idea that there’s nothing new to say about the Beatles with a revealing survey of the four-year odyssey that changed everything . . . There is a lot of simple, moment-by-moment pleasure to be had here. Howard dishes up familiar archive footage but new material as well: in particular, their final performance in Candlestick Park, San Francisco. The Beatles’ cherubic faces are strangely compelling: they did indeed look like intergalactic creatures who found a home on our planet." - The Guardian

"In fresh interviews, McCartney and Ringo Starr offer comments that Howard joins to archival observations from John Lennon and George Harrison. There are hints at what soured the Beatles on live performance (crowd frenzy, crappy amplification) and pushed them toward in-studio experimentation. The Far Four claim their bond got them through, wondering how Elvis did it alone. Sweet trumps bitter as viewers revel — through concert footage and fan-sourced clips — in the youthful sights and sounds that peaked at Shea Stadium in 1965. Whoopi Goldberg offers her own teenage testimony, recalling how her mother took her to see that Shea concert. “They were colorless,” says Whoopi, who felt like she “could be friends with them.”

Howard backgrounds the doc in an era of civil rights, pointing out that the Beatles refused to play to a segregated audience in Jacksonville, Florida. They integrated the Gator Bowl. Still, the documentary rightly keeps coming back to the music and the band’s delight in making it. Good move. It truly is a joy forever." - Rolling Stone

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